Why you should never eat food from a stranger’s plate

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If you’ve ever been to a potluck, you know the dilemma: do you eat the food that’s been sitting out, or do you wait for the host to put out a fresh plate? On one hand, you don’t want to be rude and refuse the food that’s been offered to you. On the other hand, you also don’t want to risk getting sick from eating food that’s been sitting out for too long.

So what’s the right thing to do?

Unfortunately, there’s no easy answer. It depends on a variety of factors, including how long the food has been sitting out, what kind of food it is, and who made it.

If you’re at a potluck and you’re unsure about whether or not you should eat the food that’s been sitting out, it’s always best to err on the side of caution and avoid it. Here’s why:

1. Bacteria grow rapidly at room temperature.

Bacteria are everywhere – on our hands, on surfaces, in the air. And when they find their way onto food, they can start to multiply quickly.

At room temperature, bacteria can double in number every 20 minutes. That means that if there are just a few bacteria on a piece of food when it’s served, there could be hundreds or even thousands of them by the time the food is consumed.

2. Certain types of bacteria can cause food poisoning.

There are many different types of bacteria, and not all of them are harmful. However, there are some types of bacteria that can cause food poisoning.

Food poisoning occurs when you eat food that contains harmful bacteria. The bacteria can cause symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. In severe cases, food poisoning can even be fatal.

3. It’s hard to tell if food is contaminated with bacteria.

You can’t see, smell, or taste bacteria. So, even if a piece of food looks and smells fine, it could still be contaminated with bacteria.

4. Once food is contaminated with bacteria, it’s very difficult to remove the bacteria.

Washing food will not always remove all of the bacteria. And, once bacteria are on your hands, they can easily spread to other surfaces, like countertops and utensils.

5. Some people are more vulnerable to food poisoning than others.

Some people, such as young children, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems, are more vulnerable to food poisoning than others. That’s because their bodies are not able to fight off the bacteria as effectively.

So, if you’re ever unsure about whether or not you should eat something, it’s always best to err on the side of caution and avoid it. It’s not worth risking your health for a piece of food.

1 Comment

  1. I always err on the side of caution when it comes to potlucks – I never eat anything that’s been sitting out for too long. I know it might seem like I’m being picky, but I’d rather be safe than sorry!

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