The Science of Why We Sneeze

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When we sneeze, our bodies expel a burst of air through our nose and mouth. This is usually preceded by the “AH-CHOO!” reflex, which is an autonomic reflex that helps to expel the air.

The act of sneezing helps to clear our nasal passages of irritants and pathogens. When we inhale, the air enters our nose and is filtered by the hair-like structures called cilia. The cilia help to trap any large particles, like dust or pollen, and prevent them from entering our lungs.

However, sometimes the cilia are not enough to remove all of the irritants from the air. When this happens, the irritants can cause the sensitive tissue in our nose to become inflamed. This inflammation triggers the sneeze reflex, which helps to expel the irritants from our nose.

The sneeze reflex is a complex process that involves many different parts of the body, including the brain, the nose, the throat, and the lungs.

The first step in the sneeze reflex is the “AH-CHOO!” reflex. This is a reflex that is triggered by the irritation of the tissue in the nose. When this happens, a message is sent to the brain telling the body to prepare to expel the irritants.

The brain then sends a message to the muscles in the chest and the abdomen, telling them to contract. This contraction helps to build up pressure in the lungs.

At the same time, the brain also sends a message to the muscles in the throat, telling them to relax. This relaxation allows the air to flow out of the lungs and through the nose.

The final step in the sneeze reflex is the expulsion of the air. The air is forced out of the lungs and through the nose by the muscles in the chest and the abdomen.

The sneeze reflex is a complex process, but it is a important one. The sneeze reflex helps to keep our respiratory system clear of irritants and pathogens.

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