The Great American Eclipse of 2017

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On Monday, August 21, 2017, a total eclipse of the sun was visible in a 70-mile-wide path stretching from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. It was the first total eclipse visible in the contiguous United States in 38 years, and the first in 99 years to cross the country from coast to coast.

As the moon passed in front of the sun, it cast a shadow on Earth that moved from west to east. The eclipse began in Oregon at 10:15 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time (PDT), reached Idaho at 11:33 a.m. MDT, Wyoming at 11:49 a.m. MDT, Nebraska at 12:57 p.m. CDT, Missouri at 1:13 p.m. CDT, Illinois at 1:21 p.m. CDT, Kentucky at 1:25 p.m. EDT, Tennessee at 1:27 p.m. EDT, Georgia at 1:37 p.m. EDT, and finally South Carolina at 1:48 p.m. EDT.

At its peak, the eclipse was visible in a 70-mile-wide path of totality stretching from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Along this path, the moon completely blocked out the sun, revealing the sun’s outer atmosphere, or corona.

The last time a total eclipse was visible from coast to coast in the United States was in 1918. The next coast-to-coast eclipse will occur in 2045.

The Great American Eclipse of 2017 was a truly amazing event. If you were lucky enough to witness it, you will never forget it!

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