Isabella Greenway, the first woman in Congress, was also a secret agent during World War I

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Isabella Greenway, the first woman in Congress, was also a secret agent during World War I.

Greenway was born in Brooklyn, New York, on July 4, 1867, to a wealthy family. Her father was a successful businessman, and her mother was a socialite. Greenway was educated at private schools in New York and Europe. In 1885, she married John Greenway, a wealthy rancher from Arizona. The couple had three children.

During World War I, Greenway volunteered for the American Red Cross. She was sent to France, where she worked in a hospital near the front lines. Greenway also helped to smuggle Allied soldiers out of German-occupied territory.

In 1918, Greenway was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Arizona. She was the first woman to serve in Congress from Arizona, and only the third woman elected to Congress from any state.

As a member of Congress, Greenway advocated for women’s rights and education. She also supported the war effort, and helped to raise money for the Red Cross.

After the war, Greenway continued to work for the Red Cross and other charities. In 1924, she was appointed to the Arizona State Parks Board. Greenway also helped to establish the Grand Canyon National Park.

Greenway died in 1953.

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